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20130126
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it is going to be, and if it hits us what kind of damage is it likely to do? >> well that's what nasa scientists are really going to be watching on this pass. next month on the 15th, this asteroid is going to swing just 17,000 miles away from earth at much lower than the navigation satellites and, that we use every day for tour phones and our gps. now it is not going to hit this time around, but such a close encounter of a rock this big, something like, 40 meters, meters wide, 50 meters wide, they haven't had this kind of a close encounter of a rock this size before. nasa will be watching it. scientists and astronomers will be tracking after it swings by to see how this close fly-by will change the orbit when it does come around again. martha: in your terms, these things happen, you know, every thousands of years, several thousands years. when was the last time something like this did actually make contact and what was the impact? >> well to give you some asteroid is about the same size as the rock that exploded over siberia in 1908. that event that leveled00 of square miles of land,
and wreath laying. members of the family, friends and nasa officials were on hand. i had an opportunity to sit down and talk with commander rick husband's widow. the past ten years have been anything but easy. ". >> reporter: "colombia" was 200,000 feet up when the spacecraft began to fall apart. unknown to nasa and the team, the shuttle had been damaged. a chunk of foam had come off in liftoff and punctured the wing. at the command center, rick husband's widow was thinking the worse. >> i was thinking is that it? is that the end of rick's life. >> reporter: seven sastronauts died that morning leaving behind family and friends. in an instance, she was a single mom with two young children, and without rick, it was hard. >> god created families to have a mom and dad. and so when rick left, he was a great dad. an amazing man. it was challenging to raise them as a single mom. >> reporter: there has been healing evelyn says, but it is not done. >> it is a lifelong process. i don't think that pain ever completely goes away, and perhaps the greatest memorial to "colombia" sits across the water
already gone off into private consulting on flight safety because i was tired of the way nasa was decaying. but people who were still there told me they wished they had the warning. if they had ten days warning, early in the flight, had seen the hole in the wing. that would have mobilized all their energies and the whole country's and the world's energies. they would have tried to find ways to macgyver the wing and find something on board to stick in the whole. they had to find ways to get the other ship that was being canted down into space sooner. and if they didn't have enough air on board, they would have found ways to get other rockets from other countries. and there were some available, to throw fly canisters up into space where the shuttle could have chased them down and grabbed them before the shuttle's own power ran out. those things might have happened. in hindsight, the accident investigation board looked at them and couldn't really figure out any way that was surely going to work. but they would have tried. >> yeah. >> well, a story that surrounds american heros who were lost d
and microsoft is eager to open a new nasa develop a facility at our expense and loss. one of the most important parts of this legislation as i mentioned is that we are using fees from the newly expanded h-1b1 visas and green cards difference to initiative on standard this will keep america at the cutting edge of science and technology and fuel economic growth for this country and generations to come. while each of the co-authors of this legislation have a substantial contribution, i'm especially grateful to senator hatch of utah for his leadership of senator hatch, which itself a little bit more about this legislation? >> thank you, mr. koontz. >> senator from utah. >> i want to thank you, senator coons and senator klobuchar and senator rubio here as you can see, it's a real pleasure to work with these three partners. and others as well that will remain here before we're through here today. i particularly want to thank you for the overview you have given on this bill. it's been a real pleasure for me to work with you three very innovative leaders in the sena senate. but as a number of you have
it -- it is real li startling. the nation nasa demand yearly for 120,000 computer science engineers, but our universities only produce 40,000 people a year. now, this is an indictment of our educational system. we need to fix that. we need to get to a point in this country where we have 120,000 people graduate being to meet the demand. but in the short-term we have to deal with the fact that of our 80,000 graduates are not creating here, those jobs are still going to exist. they are a just not going to exist here. these companies aren't going to wait for us to produce more graduates. these companies aren't going to wait for us to fix our immigration system. they have got a business to run. if they can't find the people they need to fill those jobs, they will send the jobs to another country. that means that these high-paying jobs in these industries will be paying the taxes in some other country, will be stimulating the economy in some other country, will be laying down roots in some other nation. you want know why america is special? because over 200 years we have been a magnet that attract
. gary, what are you expect a nasa governor makes its way up? >> s. moderate of these features you can expect with brian schweizer in his governorship. he can use whatever packard bell ontrack capital he has. he has a big month ahead of the work that will then come to his desk so he can do what his job is. >> is that what tonight is about, the tone and tenor is not too much due to this point, but setting a tone. a lot of it talked about in the previous three weeks since i got this session underway. >> the optimism in the last three weeks is genuine. i visited a couple times, almost quite a coincidence. i sense there's a good positive spirit always taken place there. and i think bullock thinks that it will keep that going. >> we hope you're right. preparing to deliver his state of the state address. as we said, about a 45 minute speech. of course quite a bit different. let's listen in now to governor steve bullock. >> now to present to you, the governor of the state of montana, the honorable steve bullock. [cheers and applause] [applause] [cheers and applause] >> lieutenant governor wal
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)